Australian Native - Eustrephus Latifolius - Wombat Berry (seed)
Australian Native - Eustrephus Latifolius - Wombat Berry (seed)
Australian Native - Eustrephus Latifolius - Wombat Berry (seed)
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Australian Native - Eustrephus Latifolius - Wombat Berry (seed)

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Wombat Berry produces plenty of showy orange berries.

The berries also attract fruit-eating birds, and the tuberous roots attract wombats and other native root-eating mammals. Wombat berry is moderately fast growing but not excessively vigorous which is handy as it's unlikely to smother other plants. 

Eustrephus latifolius is an adaptable plant that thrives in sun or partial shade. It can tolerate extended periods of dryness once established. Wombat berry will grow on most soil types and even tolerates light frost. 

As the tubers are spread out around the base just scratching around you can dig a couple up without hurting the mother plant, as long as you work out and away from the central stems.

When cooked they can be a bit tough, and taste just like a normal spud or yam, but raw are awesome, like a juicy apple in texture, and mildly sweet.

The best way to grow them for tuber production is to plant the seeds in large pots, 2 or 3 seeds per pot in clean sand, 5mm deep at the most.  Just water once a week and leave them in a shady spot or in the greenhouse (not a plastic hot house as they will rot if too humid).

Don’t bother weeding the pots as it disturbs the small roots of the seeds that are hidden underground. A couple months later when you check you should see strong little plants.

From the moment they have their 3rd set of leaves they are super hardy little troupers handling flooding rains or and drought conditions.

Once they are up and strong, you can transplant them into the garden. If you want a fast turnover of tubers raised beds are definitely the best way to go, and the productivity is amazing.

As long as the soil is sandy and drains well, or if you are on heavy clay be sure to plant them in a mound above the mud, you will have good success with these plants.

10 seeds per packet