Sweet Corn - Balinese - Heirloom
Sweet Corn - Balinese - Heirloom
Sweet Corn - Balinese - Heirloom
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Sweet Corn - Balinese - Heirloom

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 Zea Mays

Balinese Sweet Corn is an Heirloom variety that produces 2 sweet, juicy yellow-kernel corn cobs on each 2 metre tall plant, that taste delicious.

Sow all year round in the tropics. Suitable for temperate, subtropical and tropical areas. Direct sow in full sun, approx. 2cm deep, approx. 30cm apart, approx. 90cm row spacing.  Prepare soil with compost and well-rotted manure.  Soaking seed overnight will help with germination, plant directly where they are to grow, and keep soil moist until germination.  Germination approx. 7-14 days.

Once the first node on the stem shows root nodulation, hill the plants up to 25 - 30 cm deep. Count 18 days from when the silk appears and start checking for ripeness, the kernel should be milky.  

The Three Sisters Garden Growing Method
For many Native American communities, three seeds - corn, beans, and squash represent the most important crops. When planted together, the Three Sisters, work together to help one another thrive and survive.

The crops of corn, beans, and squash are known as the Three Sisters. For centuries these three crops have been the centre of Native American agriculture and culinary traditions. It is for good reason as these three crops complement each other in the garden as well as nutritionally.

Corn provides tall stalks for the beans to climb so that they are not out-competed by sprawling squash vines. Beans provide nitrogen to fertilise the soil while also stabilising the tall corn during heavy winds. The large leaves of squash plants shade the ground which helps retain soil moisture and prevent weeds.  It needs to be a running squash, not a bush squash like zucchini. 

The tradition of calling these crops the "Three Sisters" originated with the Haudenosaunee, pronounced Ho-deh-no-shaw-nee. Also known as the Iroquois, Haudenosaunee occupy the regions around the Great Lake in the Northeastern United States and Canada. 

20 seeds per packet

NOT TO WA/TAS